It’s the Noro season y’all

Laughter is the best medicine! Unless you have norovirus – vomiting is better medicine in that case. 🙂

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WHAT IS NOROVIRUS?

Typical season for the “stomach flu” “winter bug” occurs from November through April. We see illnesses occur outside of this timeframe with 80% of the outbreaks occurring between November and April. Norovirus infection causes acute gastroenteritis: nausea, frequent, sudden and occasionally violent vomiting, and/or diarrhea. Other symptoms include low-grade fever, chills, headache, muscle ache and fatigue. Symptom onset can be as soon as 12 hours after exposure, but more often 24 to 48 hours after ingesting the virus. The illness usually lasts one to two days. Most cases, recovery occurs without further complications unless the person is dehydrated.

  • Virus – very small in size and simple structure
  • Can NOT survive outside of a host
  • Human norovirus can’t be cultivated in labs
  • Virus surrogates are used for studies in labs and they do NOT always behave as Human Norovirus
  • Leading cause of Acute Gastroenteritis (worldwide)
  • 20 Mil cases in USA (per year)
  • 2/3 are from PERSON-TO-PERSON transmission, 1/3 are from FOODBORNE transmission
  • High Prevalence – Low Mortality
  • $65 Billion – Global cost
  • 5.5 Million cases per year in USA – Foodborne
  • Low infectious dose (100 or less particles required for illness)
  • High shedding rate – Million to Billion/gm (stool) and shedding may continue up to 2 weeks after symptoms

WHERE IS NORO?

  • Infected food handlers are responsible for 70% of reported outbreaks (cause is found)
  • Workers are using bare hands for Ready-to-eat foods – 50% of illnesses
  • Mainly at restaurants (64%) and catering/banquet events (17%)

WHY IS IT CHALLENGING?

  • After symptoms disappear, person can shed at a lower level for up to 2 weeks
  • Infected person can shed 1-8 million virus via vomit
  • Virus can be airborne several days beyond an incident or outbreak
  • Virus stays on infected and exposed person’s hands for several days
  • Stays on surfaces for days/week at room temp
  • Refrigeration/Freezing for weeks/months/years will not effect
  • Easily transferred – depends on moisture, type of surface, pressure
  • Highly infectious, Rapid and efficient spreading
  • Resistant to sanitizers, disinfectants, technology

WHAT DO YOU NEED?

  • Having a written plan and related tools, kits ready in your facility
  • Written and implanted employee health and illness policy – specific to the operation and easy to execute
  • Post incidence SOP in place – what to do when this happens?
  • All team members trained

Do you have a plan? Have you created and implemented a strong and executable employee health policy? What are you waiting for? Hopefully, not an outbreak from your facility…

BE WELL. (and if you are down with Noro; and work in a food facility – STAY HOME)

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FBI Risk Factors and Intervention Strategies – FDA Study

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released findings today from the initial phase of a 10-year study that is evaluating trends in food preparation practices and employee behaviors that contribute to foodborne illness outbreaks in the retail setting.

You can read the 84-page document (link provided below) or read a quick summary here.

Background:

Foodborne illness remains a major public health concern in the United States. Foodborne diseases cause ~48 million illnesses and ~3000 deaths each year. Economic burden due to foodborne illness is estimated at $77 billion dollars (Scharff, 2012).

Restaurant industry is a major driver of food service and consumer demand for food away from home has led to increased spending in both fast food and full-service restaurants, with more than one million restaurant locations employing 14 million people. Per CDC studies, more than half of foodborne illness outbreaks that occur each year are associated with food from restaurants. Activities related to food handling and preparation practices were the most commonly reported contributing factors within restaurant-associated outbreaks by CDC.

Most regulatory food inspection programs monitor the following risk factors while conducting routine food safety inspections, and each factor necessitates specific food safety behaviors and practices.

  • Poor personal hygiene
  • Improper food holding/time and temperature
  • Contaminated equipment/protection from contamination
  • Inadequate cooking
  • Food obtained from unsafe sources

FDA specialists collected inspection data in 2013-2014 for research – to be used as baseline for better intervention strategies, food safety practices – moving forward. This data collection period combined with current 2017-2018 and future (2021-2022) will be useful for identifying relationship between Food Safety Management System (FSMS) and Certified Food Protection Manager (CFPM), and how these risk factors and food safety behaviors are associated with foodborne illness in restaurants.

FSMS refers to a specific set of actions (procedures, training, and monitoring) to help achieve Active Managerial Control (AMC). Non-existent or inadequate FSMS are thought to contribute to the worldwide burden of foodborne disease.

CFPM is an individual who has shown proficiency in food safety and possess an accredited certificate, as required by most regulatory agencies. Research has shown that the presence of a CFPM is associated with improved inspection scores (Hedberg et al., 2007; Brown et al., 2014)

Food Code emphasizes the need for risk-based preventive controls and daily AMC of the risk factors contributing to foodborne illness. AMC is “the purposeful incorporation of specific actions or procedures by industry management into the operation of their business to attain control over foodborne illness risk factors” (FDA, 2013). AMC involves the continuous identification and proactive prevention of food safety hazards. Two strategies supporting AMC efforts in food establishments that have received growing attention are presence of a CFPM and an effective FSMS.

Research and results:

Data items that were included in FDA’s studies included:

  • proper handwashing practice
  • no bare hand contact of ready-to-eat foods
  • protection from cross contamination (during storage, preparation, and display)
  • food contact surfaces properly cleaned and sanitized
  • TCS foods are held at proper temperature
  • displayed or stored hot foods are held at proper temperature
  • foods are cooled properly
  • TCS RTE foods are properly date marked/discarded within 7 days
  • raw animal foods are cooked to required temperatures
  • foods are reheated to required temperatures

From food safety behaviors/practices that were investigated in this FDA study, we see that restaurants had better control over no bare hand contact with ready-to-eat foods and making sure that raw animal foods are cooked to their required internal temperatures. But, there remains a huge need to gain better control over food employee’s handwashing habits and controlling temperatures of TCS foods.

Some results are very alarming: For full service restaurants, more than 2/3 of visited facilities did not date-mark their TCS foods properly; more than 2/3 did not cool their hot foods properly before storing it; almost 2/3 had dirty food contact surfaces; and 1/3 failed to reheat foods to proper temps. For fast food restaurants, 1/2 of visited facilities failed to cool foods properly; 40% had dirty food contact surfaces; 1/3 did not date-mark their TCS foods properly; and more than 1/3 failed to prevent cross-contamination of foods.

Also,

  • Fast food restaurants that are multi-unit operation showed 2.65 out-of-compliance items compared with the ones that are not a chain operation, who showed 4.51 out-of-compliance items. CHAIN RESTAURANTS PEFORMED BETTER.
  • The difference in mean number of out-of-compliance items for graded inspection was extremely minor. The difference was also minor for jurisdictions that required public disclosure of inspection report. The difference where food handler training is mandatory or not was equally minimal. This was true for fast food and full-service restaurants. GRADING OR PUBLIC DISCLOSURE DOES NOT IMPACT COMPLIANCE.
  • Fast food restaurants with a CFPM present and in charge had a significantly lower number of data items out-of-compliance than those with no CFPM. 2.88 vs 3.46 – HAVING A CFPM MEANS BETTER COMPLIANCE.
  • Full-service restaurants that are multi-unit operation showed 4.66 out-of-compliance items compared with the ones that are not a chain operation, who showed 5.30 out-of-compliance items. CHAIN RESTAURANTS PEFORMED BETTER.
  • Full-service restaurants with a CFPM present and in charge had a significantly lower number of data items out-of-compliance than those with no CFPM. 4.73 vs 5.69 – HAVING A CFPM MEANS BETTER COMPLIANCE.
  • FSMS were the strongest predictor of items being out-of-compliance in both fast food and full-service restaurants: those with well-developed FSMS had significantly less food safety behaviors/practices out-of-compliance than those with less developed systems. HAVE AN EFFICIENT AND PROPERLY IMPLEMENTED FSMS.
  • Restaurants with a CFPM present at the time of data collection were associated with fewer out-of-compliance food safety behaviors/practices.
  • Simply having a CFPM employed without that individual being present does not materially improve the restaurant’s compliance. The correlations between CFPM and out-of-compliance become non-significant, indicating that FSMS (not the presence of a CFPM) predicts better compliance with food safety behaviors/practices.

What do we learn from this?

It is extremely important to have your own FSMS. Documents can sit in a binder and collect dust but unless you have provided adequate and proper training, all tools and ways to resolve discrepancies, it is absolutely of no use. Train all team members, requiring mandatory accredited certification and provide all necessary tools for them.

It is not complicated y’all!

_______

Read all 84 pages (including checklist used) from FDA publication here.

Some reference material used in FDA’s publication:

Cates, S.C., Muth, M.K., Karns, S.A., Penne, M.A., Stone, C.N., Harrison, J.E., and Radke, V.J. (2008). Certified Kitchen Managers: Do They Improve Restaurant Inspection Outcomes? Journal of Food Protection, (72)2, 384-391.
Hedberg, C.W., Smith, S.J., Kirkland, E., Radke, V., Jones, T.F., Selman, C.A., and EHS-Net Working Group (2006). Systematic Environmental Evaluations to Identify Food Safety Differences between Outbreak and Nonoutbreak Restaurants. Journal of Food Protection, (69)11, 2697-2702.
Leinwand, S.E., Glanz, K., Keenan, B.T., and Branas, C. C. (2017). Inspection Frequency, Sociodemographic Factors, and Food Safety Violations in Chain and Nonchain Restaurants, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2013-2014. Public Health Reports, 10,1-8.
Luning, P.A., Marcelis, W.J., Rovira, J., Van der Spiegal, M., Uyttendaela, M., and Jacxsens, L. (2009). Systematic Assessment of Core Assurance Activities in a Company-specific Food Safety Management System. Trends in Food Science & Technology, 20(6), 300-312.

 

Ten Commandments – Food Safety Plan

Ten Commandments – Food Safety Management

You have seen the ten commandments in your spiritual life but what about the food ten_commandments_hebrew_stonesafety life?

 

As we all know, the DoJ has stepped into the food industry and they can seek to prosecute cases where illnesses have occurred – restaurant companies, manufacturers, etc. Our consumers are demanding “cleaner” products as they eat out or purchase their food. With the science of genome sequencing, it’s possible to link illnesses from years earlier to their source, meaning a past incident can come back to haunt a company – long after the event.

Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) – based regulations are here. The first impression that restaurants and grocery stores would not be impacted is now becoming clear that the ripple effect of FSMA will increase the food safety demands on them as well. FDA has written the rules for some flexibility – which is causing significant confusion and it carries the risk of many in the industry getting something wrong and placing considerable and unnecessary strain on already overburdened QA professionals.

Therefore, the food safety professionals cannot manage food safety program in the same old way. There has never been a more important time to stop, take a critical and unbiased view of the food safety management systems and processes, and emulate best practices being used in the industry.

Follow these 10 simple commandments:

  1. Senior Leadership Team on your side

Senior leadership want to know: ROI, key issues and plans to address those, business trending, strategies employed to move the business in the right direction, and how the quality and food safety strategies support business strategies and objectives. These strategies are always focused on the customer.

Be clear with the senior leaders’ group about the investment required in food safety, and the benefits gained through the investment. As we all know, the investment is significantly less costly than the problems. Provide simple but impactful food safety training to the senior leaders. This will highlight that effective food safety training is provided for every team member in the company.

  1. Suppliers audited

Regularly audit all suppliers, especially prior to their first delivery of items. Must review supplier’s track record so it can be established that appropriate systems and processes exist. The audits need to be structured so that all of the elements supporting the supplier’s ability to reliably meet all the quality and food safety requirements are checked, and where deficiencies are found, formal corrective actions are established. There are a number of good auditing schemes in widespread use, accredited under the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI).

Best practice in this area: Obtain full copy of every audit, review the audit outcomes to establish that risks are effectively identified and managed; and ensure that corrective actions requested by the auditor are resolved in a timely manner.

  1. Supplier Specifications

To ensure consistency of the items you are using in your restaurant, specification is required for most items.

The specification should include the chemical, physical, and biological parameters the supplier has promised to comply with to ensure the item is safe. The specification should also contain a full ingredient list of the product, including the presence or otherwise of any allergens. This is essential to enable rapid investigation of the presence of a particular ingredient of concern that may be subject of a wider recall.

  1. Supplier Performance

Supplier audit is merely a point-in-time assessment, and may or may not reflect the typical week-to-week performance of a given supplier. Be sure to include conformance to specifications, the number and rate of corrective actions and timely responses to measure performance. The best industry practice is to keep your dialogue and communication with the suppliers – – fact based; transparently providing comments to the supplier on their actual performance.

  1. Risk Assessment and Preventative Controls

Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) is used on a voluntary basis by few operators, though not currently required. The HACCP process identifies all hazards that may exist and clarifies the point at which the hazard can be managed or controlled. This process prevents the hazard: a) from entering the food, b) eliminating it in product, or c) reducing it to acceptable levels.

FSMA’s requires for the supplier to identify particular hazard, if not controlled by their process. In this case, they must advise users of their non-compliance in writing.

Restaurants must acknowledge that items such as raw meats, fresh produce, and many other items contain hazards, and take on the responsibility for controlling specific hazard. Implement HACCP (if possible) to ensure that the hazard is effectively controlled.

  1. Validate | Monitor | Document |

The validation step determines that the control measures put in place are scientifically sound and will control the identified hazard. Managers and team members are required to “monitor” the control measures to ensure the hazard is eliminated/controlled.

The best way to verify a restaurant’s plan is being followed is to document the evidence. One can also include a review of the execution and evidence for corrective actions being taken when control measures are out of compliance. Verification is providing proof that you are doing what you said you needed to.

  1. Corrective Actions

Organize workflow, take prompt and timely corrective action when something fails and always follow-up. Documentation of all the required communication of the details between the parties is very important. Train and re-train as necessary.

  1. Documentation

An arduous food safety management system ensures that everything is documented—a challenging task in today’s dynamic work environment because of pressure on new product development, constant change in the supplier world, pressure on value engineering, and staff turnover. For documentation to be truly effective, each element of data needs to be dated, and each action must be trackable. Thankfully, technology has changed, and in this cloud-based computing age and with the right software, data can be available to anyone who is authorized, from any device, at any time and from any location.

  1. Complaints and Social Media

While employee empowerment is a great approach to resolve complaints at the point of receipt, there must also be an entrenched process of identifying and resolving common causes. Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, etc.) being used by the masses – can’t be ignored and must be effectively monitored and managed.

  1. Professional FTE

One must have a food safety professional on staff – company’s growth and future plans must include a FTE, if not already! Consultants can help and assist you and your team as well – but there are limitations to this.

In short: Almost 60% of all food borne illnesses in the US is caused by food consumed from a food service facility, the business must take every possible step to ensure brand protection and that all food served is safe to eat.

Image: via leewoof.org

Win Super Bowl – Food Safety Defense

Defense wins Championship

As you get ready to serve food to your guests in a restaurant or your loved one, follow these simple FOOD SAFETY DEFENSE rules to avoid food safety penalties during fast-paced Super Bowl celebratiosb51_game_ball_front_1ns.

Personal foul

That hand towel on your oven or hanging from your belt is a 15-yard penalty. Not sanitizing food-contact surfaces before, during, and after prepping raw vegetables and meat is going to
create challenges for your coaching staff. Disposable sanitizing wipes are convenient, fast, and effective at home to prevent cross-contamination that may cause foodborne illnesses.

Illegal formation

Two hours is the maximum time foods should be kept at room temperature. Just one bacterium, doubling every 20 minutes, could grow to over 2 million bacteria in seven hours! Don’t hesitate – refrigerate at 41°F or colder. Meat, poultry, fish and dairy products, pasta, rice, beans and cooked vegetables should be consumed in 2 hours or place them in refrigerator. Refrigerate salads with meat/fish/chicken/seafood, fresh-cut fruits until used.

Clock management

Pre-moistened sanitizer wipes are the smartest way to maintain clean and sanitary hands and surfaces when every second counts.

Unnecessary roughness

Refrigerate take-out
foods right away if you won’t be eating them within two hours after buying. For large quantities, divide food into loosely covered shallow containers before refrigerating and then cover tightly when cool. If you leave your pizza and other perishable foods at room temperature for more than two hours, you will be moving back 15 yards.

Delay of game

Plan to eat take-out foods and leftovers within a day (Monday) for greater safety and quality.

Illegal substitution

Don’t reheat take-out food in its original container in the microwave, unless the container is described as safe for microwave use. Reheat all foods to 165°F. Use a food thermometer and proper utensils.

Illegal use of hands

Provide hand sanitizing wipes before, during, and after preparing or handling food. Wash your hands as many times as you can when preparing/handling food items – especially ready to eat food items.

Neutral-Zone infraction

You can’t see, smell, or taste bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. It takes from half an hour to two or more weeks before you get sick from contaminated food. Sometimes it’s hard to know if food has been handled safely. If you are not sure, throw it away. No delays allowed.

Hike – Wash, Wipe, Refrigerate, Toss, OMAHA Hut!

Notes: A cooler well packed with ice or frozen gel packs is a practical alternative to a refrigerator. Keep the cooler in the shade. After food comes out of the cooler, remember the two-hour rule. Keep it at 41°F or below. Use a chafing dish, warming tray, steam table, slow cooking pot or a place on the side of the cooking grill. Keep it at 140°F or higher. 

ENJOY THE BIG GAME!

Super Bowl LI is in Houston!

Football photo: courtesy Wilson.com

 

Raw Cookie Dough or not?

Since that late evening bowl of your favorite ice cream is not enough, you add that frozen scoop of chocolate chip cookie dough. Butter, cream, chocolate and a combination of granulated sugar sends satisfying impulses from your tongue directly to your brain, even before you pick up that first spoon. Did you just make that cookie dough in your kitchen or did you buy it from a store?

An FDA warning released earlier this week has consumers confused as to whether uncooked cookie dough is safe to eat because of potential contamination with a type of bacteria that can cause pain in your GI tract. You’re okay eating most commercial cookie dough products–in cookie dough ice cream, where the product is intended to be eaten uncooked.

Edible-Cookie-Dough-Recipe-Step-1Biggest concern is for people eating anything uncooked that contains flour purchased off the shelf or delivered in 50-pound bags to pizzerias and bakeries.

To be perfectly clear:

  • Do not eat any uncooked dough, cake batter, uncooked tortillas, etc. at home.
  • Do not allow your kids (or yourself) to play with dough or flour-based “clay” that some restaurants give away. Check with your day care center and make sure.

So, you wonder:

How can raw cookie dough sold commercially be safe while grandma’s wholesome recipe made at home runs the risk of giving you bloody diarrhea (sorry to gross you out)?

Why does no one seem to be talking about the risks of uncooked eggs that you also add to many home recipes?

The raw dough alarm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been investigating the cause of severe intestinal symptoms in 20 states beginning back in December 2015. Ten people have been hospitalized and one patient went into a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome. These infections have ranged from age 1 to 95, with a median age of 18. Interestingly, 78% of people with the illness are female. I wonder who is guilty of tasting that cookie dough while prepping?

Thankfully – so far, no one has died from raw cookie dough illness.

Multistate-Outbreak-of-Shiga-toxin-producing-Escherichia-coli-O121-Infections-Linked-to-Flour-June-2016-E.-coli-CDCPhoto Credit: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A type of E. coli bacteria called Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O121, or STEC O121 is the common bacteria. Investigations reveal the most likely source of these bacteria is a factory in Kansas City, Missouri. As a result, General Mills issued a recall on May 31 of all sizes and varieties of Gold Medal Flour, Gold Medal Wondra Flour and Signature Kitchens. On June 11, the company confirmed that the FDA had found the bacteria in one sample among the many that were tested.

Because flour has a long shelf life, more cases may emerge.

Most manufacturers of pre-made cookie dough use a heat treatment for flour and a pasteurization process for eggs which, unrelated to this E. coli outbreak, are a known source of disease-causing Salmonella bacteria.

Lesson learned?

Just don’t make homemade cookie dough ice cream unless you have pasteurizing process and related equipment. If that’s your favorite flavor, buy commercially made products. Manufacturers (should) use ingredients that include treated flour and pasteurized eggs.

Don’t eat uncooked flour. Don’t play with it and then touch your face.  Processed foods can sometimes be safer for you than “natural.”

Local-grown or not?

FOOD SAFETY CHALLENGES FOR “TRACTOR-TO-TABLE” MOVEMENT

The “tractor-to-table” (or farm-to-fork or whatever else you call it) movement attracts restaurants and grocery stores to adapt to guests wanting locally grown foods that may be looked as more “natural.”  Food establishment operators may forget that several factors make food commodities from small local suppliers a possible source of brand protection risk, especially for quick-serve and fast-casual operations.

Factors for the operators when “tractor-to-table” movement is added:

All food establishment operators know about these risks and this is nothing new.  The operators and decision-makers must focus on how the “tractor-to-table” approach makes business sense so long as these risks are identified and remedied in a systematic way, and not just being part of a standard operating procedure (SOP) document. Unless operators manage risks with a layered approach and building food safety into daily culture, there are more chances of failure.

  • Employee knowledge and food-safety awareness.

Operators attract transient workers like students, workers that are searching for any job, workers that are retired and someone who is simply new to workforce.  They lack a background in food safety. Their leader (supervisor) may also be new to their responsibilities. The risk elimination and management is a must.

  • Brand protection and regulatory compliance.

In a social media dominant world with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and Yelp – bad customer experience or an alleged foodborne illness linked to a particular location/brand or food supplier can go viral—pun intended—in minutes.  Public health department and consumers will know about the problems instantly. With the federal, state and local regulatory workforce being at more aware-level, operators and risk management officials need to know how to assess and remedy each situation very quickly. These so called challenges go beyond the regulatory compliance level. The media and guests will demand to be informed.  Enhanced and efficient crisis communications strategy can be very useful in preventing severe damage to brand identity and overall reputation if rumors and wrong information is shared and re-tweeted by the consumers.

  • Farms – Supply chain issues.

The recent Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) requires monitoring and inspection for farm operations. Smaller food suppliers, which are not covered by FSMA, are less scrutinized. This doesn’t mean local suppliers don’t follow proper food safety and sanitation procedures. They are less regulated, which could increase the potential risk of tainted foods entering the supply chain.

How do we address these factors?

  • Being Proactive

Revise and modify training to ensure essential practices are included and related rationale is clearly explained and continuously refreshed.  This training is for everyone, not just new hires.  Review every step in food handling to document potential gaps. Where are the more transient food handlers? Where the most significant turnover? Every vendor in supply chain is visited to check their food safety and sanitation practices.  If FSMA rules exempt the vendor, the review and visit become even more important.  A crisis response plan is included in training so that food handlers know their roles before any critical event happens.

  • Timely Identification

Establishment operators must have proper system(s) in place to identify issues quickly. Example: Storage facilities are continuously monitored for safe holding temperature and sanitation. Invest in technology so that temperature monitors provide 24/7 coverage and alert you when critical issues occur.

Let the guests and customers alert you to major concerns that they experienced during their visit. Monitor these hotlines and email ID to resolve as they are reported. Most social media will display a “trending” item/topic. Have dedicated staff member monitor web-based activities.

  • Quick Remedy

Take immediate corrective actions in conjunction with senior management personnel.  Launch the crisis response plan as soon as possible.  Consult legal authority, crisis communications team or outside agencies and others who need to weigh in and manage the crisis. Identify the root cause for the problem and how it can be prevented in future.  Learning from a successfully managed crisis, update food safety and sanitation processes.

Reach out to the guest as soon as possible and inform them that the crisis has been resolved. Let them know that they should feel confident in a positive future dining experience.

I am hopeful that this will help you decide whether you want to go “local” or not!

12 days of Christmas – Inspection

12 Days of Christmas and MY INSPECTION

 

  1. On the 1st day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: light shields for all my light fixtures.
  2. On the 2nd day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  3. On the 3rd day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  4. On the 4th day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: no expired (out of date) food items, proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  5. On the 5th day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: proper labeled and stored chemicals, no expired (out of date) food items, proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  6. On the 6th day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: all utensils stored properly, proper labeled and stored chemicals, no expired (out of date) food items, proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  7. On the 7th day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: no wet nesting, all utensils stored properly, proper labeled and stored chemicals, no expired (out of date) food items, proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  8. On the 8th day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: all utensils in good repair and not rusty or chipped, no wet nesting, all utensils stored properly, proper labeled and stored chemicals, no expired (out of date) food items, proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  9. On the 9th day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: clean gaskets and shelves in my restaurant, all utensils in good repair and not rusty or chipped, no wet nesting, all utensils stored properly, proper labeled and stored chemicals, no expired (out of date) food items, proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  10. On the 10th day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: all gaskets in good repair, clean gaskets and shelves in my restaurant, all utensils in good repair and not rusty or chipped, no wet nesting, all utensils stored properly, proper labeled and stored chemicals, no expired (out of date) food items, proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  11. On the 11th day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: all foods stored at 41°F or below, all gaskets in good repair, clean gaskets and shelves in my restaurant, all utensils in good repair and not rusty or chipped, no wet nesting, all utensils stored properly, proper labeled and stored chemicals, no expired (out of date) food items, proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.
  12. On the 12th day of MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: clean ice machine/bar-gun holder/dishes/utensils/cutting boards, all foods stored at 41°F or below, all gaskets in good repair, clean gaskets and shelves in my restaurant, all utensils in good repair and not rusty or chipped, no wet nesting, all utensils stored properly, proper labeled and stored chemicals, no expired (out of date) food items, proper food storage hierarchy, food container covers for all my stored food items, and light shields for all my light fixtures.

  

On the 13th day of my MY INSPECTION, my inspector gave to me: a perfect 100% score and I celebrated so much that I became sick from foodborne happiness!